Recannalizations of Occluded Major Veins

Angioplasty & Stenting

During an angioplasty, a small balloon is inflated inside a narrowed blood vessel. The balloon helps to widen your blood vessel and improve blood flow. After widening the vessel with angioplasty, your vascular surgeon sometimes inserts a stent depending upon the circumstances.

Stents are tiny metal mesh tubes that support your vein walls to keep your vessels wide open.

Angioplasty and stenting are usually done through a small puncture, or sometimes a small incision, in your skin, called the access site. Your vascular surgeon inserts a long, thin tube called a catheter through this access site. Using X-ray guidance, your physician then guides the catheter through your blood vessels to the blocked area. The tip of the catheter carries the angioplasty balloon or stent.

Stenting is used to treat May-Thurner Syndrome, or iliac compression syndrome by treating the narrowing of the iliac veins thru the use of a Iliac Stent. In some cases, Lipodermatosclerosis may require angioplasty or stenting.

Thrombolytic Treatment

Thrombolytic therapy is a treatment used to break up dangerous clots inside your blood vessels, such as the one in the deep veins of your legs, called deep vein thrombosis or DVT.   To perform this treatment, a  clot-dissolving medication is injected into a blood vessel. In some cases, the medications flow through your bloodstream to the clot. In other cases, your physician guides a long, thin tube, called a catheter, through your blood vessels to the area of the clot. Depending on the circumstances, the tip of the catheter may carry special attachments that break up clots. The catheter then delivers medications or mechanically breaks up the clot.

MVC satisfies State of Florida Board of Medicine requirements for office-based surgery and is accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). and Intersocietal Accreditation Commission – Vein Center (IAC-VC). Our vascular laboratory has been accredited for the last decade by the Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Vascular Laboratories (ICA-VL). The IAC programs for accreditation are dedicated to ensuring quality patient care and promoting health care and are all dedicated to one common mission: improving health care through accreditation. Our two fully equipped endovascular suites are state-of-the-art. We are one of the only Vein Centers in the United States which has earned “triple accreditation.”

At MVC we have 7000 square feet of space to accommodate multiple examination rooms, a full-service operating room, 2 vascular laboratories and an angiosuite. This allows us to a full-service Endovascular Venous Surgery center.